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Turbine Aerodynamic Visualization Output

Hello QBlade R&D team, I am using the NREL 5MW wind turbine qpr wind turbine model provided on the official website to study the impact of different wind shear factors on wind turbine performance. By using the FVW wake modeling method, this study investigates the effect of different wind shear exponents(WSE) on the wake shape behind the wind turbine nacelle. Among them, both the trailing vortex and the shedding vortex of the wind turbine are checked and opened, and the shape of the wind turbine’s wake is shown in the figure,

NREL 5MW turbine wake visualization
I would like to ask how to operate to obtain a result graph similar to other literature, as shown in the following figure:
The shape of blade tip vortex wake after different wind shear factors act on wind turbines

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Hello,

there is no default function to generate a plot similar to the one you have attached.

However, you can achieve a similar visualization by post-processing the wake data.

To do this, export velocity cut-planes for post-processing in ParaView or similar software. This approach allows you to visualize the wake vorticity, effectively highlighting the tip and root vortices.

BR,

David

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Thank you very much for your reply! Since my knowledge of QBlade software is limited, I would like to clarify further, does the “export velocity cut-planes” in your reply refer to the operation in the picture QBlade_Post below? In practice, Cut_Plane Options in DockI found that in QBlade, I can output the velocity vectors on a certain plane by checking the “Cut Plane” box, and then I can output the Turbine Simulation as a .cut file. The example data in the .cut file is shown in the figure belowexportPlaneData, and stores only the geometry and accuracy parameters of the flow field, but does not include the velocities of any vortex points. How can this be accomplished by Paraview post-processing software to schematize the tip vortices and root vortices? Can you please be more detailed, thank you very much for your reply!

 

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Hello,

the .cut file you mentioned does not contain the velocity data of the cut-plane. Instead, it holds the geometric definition of the cut-plane itself. This .cut definition can be used to automate the generation of cut-planes across multiple simulations.

To export the velocity data from the cut-plane you have to click on the *Export Current Cut Plane* button in the Dock Window. You then have the option to export the cut-plane data either in a .txt format or in the .vtu (VTK unstructured XML) format, which can directly be imported by ParaView.

BR,

David

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Thanks again for your reply, I have successfully exported the cut-plane data of the XOY plane i.e. the plane along the streamwise direction to .vtu format by the method you have mentioned. The created plane data as well as the .vtu data are shown below respectively. The .vtu format file can indeed be recognized and read by the post-processing software Paraview. The results are shown below. The generated .vtu file contains a visualization of the blades and pylons, and should also contain other information about the planes such as speed or vortex structure. Unfortunately, I still have not been able to complete the visualization of the trailing edge behind the WTG in Paraview. So I will have to ask you again. I hope I am not disturbing you and look forward to your reply!

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Hello,

it looks like you are almost there!

The velocity data is included in the “XOY_Velocity_Field_data.vtu” object. When you select this object in ParaView, you can choose from a drop-down menu which quantity should be plotted. Additionally, ParaView allows you to apply various filters or post-processing methods to the velocity field to highlight vortex structures, among other features.

I suggest checking out ParaView’s documentation or watching some online video tutorials on how to perform these tasks in ParaView. There are quite a few excellent resources available.

Best,

David

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